Teach, learn, caulk, measure

Above … Ron Dahlke guides Kevin Rehberg through how to properly toenail studs. Apprentice Kevin is building a new section of wall where Aaron Pratt needs structure for the cabinets he will design, build and install — and for the electric and plumbing lines that will weave through the new lumber. At the back door, Cris works out the door trim he will nail into place — brickmold PVC that will never rot, trimmed into flat stock on the table saw, flipped to put the cut side up against the flashing, leaving the finished side exposed for paint.

From outside, Cris nails the PVC trim into place around the back door off the kitchen and family room.
From outside, Cris nails the PVC trim into place around the back door off the kitchen and family room.
This is the back wall of the kitchen -- or the side of the house, depending on perspective. The cooktop and hood will be installed at left. The sink will be centered under the window, with the dishwasher to the right of the sink. The hole at the bottom of the wall is where the original cooktop vented outside. Cris from Ranserve shimmed the studs with long wedges of lumber, because it leans out about 1/2-inch at the top. The electricians marked the wall to track the wire runs and switches they will install -- and, at right, below the window, the plumbers tacked into place a metal plate that prevents nails from penetrating water lines. This is a busy, hard-working wall.
This is the back wall of the kitchen — or the side of the house, depending on perspective. The cooktop and hood will be installed at left. The sink will be centered under the window, with the dishwasher to the right of the sink. The hole at the bottom of the wall is where the original cooktop vented outside. Cris from Ranserve shimmed the studs with long wedges of lumber, because it leans out about 1/2-inch at the top. The electricians marked the wall to track the wire runs and switches they will install — and, at right, below the window, the plumbers tacked into place a metal plate that prevents nails from penetrating water lines. This is a busy, hard-working wall.
This is the trench carved into the slab by Cris and Kevin -- which the electricians will use to run wire in conduit to outlets mounted in the island.
This is the trench carved into the slab by Cris and Kevin — which the electricians will use to run wire in conduit to outlets mounted in the island.
The painters are caulking the windows, sealing up the house with silicon in preparation for expanding foam insulation. Only the lower portion of each window is caulked. Ron explains that the top and sides will be sealed with foam.
The painters are caulking the windows, sealing up the house with silicon in preparation for expanding foam insulation. Only the lower portion of each window is caulked. Ron explains that the top and sides will be sealed with foam.
The electrical walk continues in the master bath. Steve from Capstone, left, and Ron, doublecheck everything that Steven measured out, ensuring that the center of the sink will properly align with the center of the medicine cabinets -- and where to mount electrical outlets at each side of the shelf above the vanity. This is the second time we've marked these measures, applying the basic rule of building anything -- "measure twice, cut once."
The electrical walk continues in the master bath. Steve from Capstone, left, and Ron, doublecheck everything that Steven measured out, ensuring that the center of the sink will properly align with the center of the medicine cabinets — and where to mount electrical outlets at each side of the shelf above the vanity. This is the second time we’ve marked these measures, applying the basic rule of building anything — “measure twice, cut once.”
Architect Brett Grinkmeyer visited at Steven's request to consult on potential paint colors for the exterior of Emerald Hill. Ron walked Brett and Steven up to the master bedroom, asking for guidance on how to adjust and center all the ceiling lights and air-conditioning vents -- organizing what would otherwise appear to be haphazard, unplanned holes that staggered drunkenly across the ceiling.
Architect Brett Grinkmeyer visited at Steven’s request to consult on potential paint colors for the exterior of Emerald Hill. Ron walked Brett and Steven up to the master bedroom, asking for guidance on how to adjust and center all the ceiling lights and air-conditioning vents — organizing what would otherwise appear to be haphazard, unplanned holes that staggered drunkenly across the ceiling.

Notes from the day:

  • Ross Britton walked Emerald Hill with Ron, auditing the installation of the HVAC ducts.
  • Ron and Steven talked about the staircase demo and rebuild that is planned for later this week — and removal of the oak flooring, in hopes it can be donated to Habitat for re-use.
  • Cris found the wires to the sprinkler system at the back of the garage — this will be important when it’s time to rebuild the sprinkler system.
  • And a series of inspections might start Wednesday this week.
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