Tag Archives: window

Befores / Afters

The exterior of the kitchen wall as of 22 July 2015.
The exterior of the kitchen wall as of 22 July 2015.

Yesterday, the brick exterior wall at the back of the kitchen was cut open for the new, larger window over the kitchen sink — and the original sliding glass door was still in place.

Same wall, 24 hours later. The new office window to the left, the new kitchen window to the right.
Same wall, 24 hours later. The new office window to the left, the new kitchen window to the right.

Today, the framing crew cut open the wall to add the new window to Steven’s office, and then mounted the new office and kitchen windows into place.

New window on the left was a brick wall yesterday.
New window on the left was a brick wall yesterday.

Here’s the new window in the office, from inside the office. More light!

The sliding glass door is removed from the back wall of the kitchen, and concrete mixed to create a new footing.
The sliding glass door is removed from the back wall of the kitchen, and concrete mixed to create a new footing.

And the sliding glass door has been removed. The brick wall here will be extended to the right, toward the garage. A new 36-inch wide exterior door will slot into the corner with the garage.

The original sliding glass door from the kitchen.
The original sliding glass door from the kitchen. With Steven’s backpack sitting guard.

Here is the sliding glass door, removed, ready for donation to Habitat.

 

 

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Learning to speak window

From Wikipedia … The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a United States 501(c)3 non-profit organization which sponsors an energy efficiency certification and labeling program for windows, doors, and skylights.[1]

NFRC labels provide performance ratings for such products in five categories: U-Factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient, Visible Transmittance, Air Leakage, and Condensation Resistance.[1] This allows architects, builders, code officials, contractors, home owners, and specifiers to compare the energy efficiency among products, and determine whether a product meets code.

Here’s the video that NFRC uses to explain the window label.

From the Home Building / Remodeling web site:

On window labels, there are 5 basic pieces of information that are very important:

  1. U-factor measures how well a window prevents heat transfer. The lower the U-factor, the better a window’s resistance to heat flow. It also means it has a better insulating value. A window with a U-factor of 0.25 has an R-value of 4 (1/.25=4).
  2. Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) determines how well a window blocks heat from sunlight.  SHGC is measured from 0 to 1 and it’s the fraction of incident solar radiation through a window. The lower the number, the less solar heat transmits into the home.
  3. Visible Transmittance (VT) is how much light comes through a window or skylight. It’s also measured between 0 and 1. The lower the number means the lesser amount of visible light shines through. If a window has a VT of 0.85, that means that 85% of the light will transmit through the window.
  4. Air Leakage (AL) measures air infiltration through cracks in the frame, sash, and the window as a whole. The rating is shown as equivalent cubic feet of air that passes through a square foot of window. The lower the number, the lower amount of air that passes through.
  5. Condensation Resistance (CR) is the ability of the window to resist the formation of condensation on the inside of the window during colder weather. CR is measured between 0 and 100 with the higher rating indicating that it’s better at resisting condensation forming on the interior of the window.
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The first windows go in

Delivered today. Installed today. Ron Dahlke is NOT wasting time.

From left … casements at the loft, fixed window over the stairwell, awning at the laundry room.

Photo shot by Jacquela using her Galaxy 5.

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Delivery day — windows, Tyvek, Hardie

Ron Dahlke is cranking at Emerald Hill. Martel Windows & Doors delivered the Milgard windows. Tyvek housewrap and Hardie board arrived.

The Milgard windows stacked in what will be the library/dining room.
The Milgard windows stacked in what will be the library/dining room.
The last three Milgard windows arrive.
The last three Milgard windows arrive.
The front windows for the library/dining room.
The front windows for the library/dining room. Photo shot with Jacquela’s Galaxy 5.
Two rolls of Tyvek house wrap and trim lumber, stored on the garage floor.
Two rolls of Tyvek house wrap and trim lumber, stored on the garage floor.
A palette of Hardie board exterior siding, stacked on the driveway.
A palette of Hardie board exterior siding, stacked on the driveway.
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Notes, 20 July 2015

  • Ron Dahlke reports Emerald Hill passed inspection by ATS Engineering for sheathing nail pattern. Tyvek housewrap to be delivered 21 July.
  • First delivery of windows is scheduled for 21 July.
  • Chimney will be inspected 21 July for integrity of flashing at the roof; with the interior walls open, we can see evidence of water leakage. Ron suspects we may need to add a cricket.
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There shall be windows

Back from the wedding in NY. An early Monday morning visit to Emerald Hill. Ron, Cris and the Ranserve crew are framing the new window openings on the second floor, front exterior.

On the second storey, from left, framing for the new loft window; new framing to close up the exterior wall where the original bathroom window is removed -- identified by the new/bright/clean vertical lumber; and, at right, what will become the new front windows for the master bedroom.
On the second story, from left, framing for the new loft window; new framing to close up the exterior wall where the original bathroom window is removed — identified by the new/bright/clean vertical lumber; and, at right, what will become the new front windows for the master bedroom.
From inside what will be the master bedroom, OSB sheathing closes off what will be the new front windows, with the original side window also closed off. The bright light on the floor is Steven's cell phone, providing enough light for the camera autofocus to shoot.
From inside what will be the master bedroom, OSB sheathing closes off what will be the new front windows, with the original side window also closed off. The bright light on the floor is Steven’s cell phone, providing enough light for the camera autofocus to shoot.
Ranserve is stacking the original windows and shutters for donation to Habitat.
Ranserve is stacking the original windows and shutters for donation to Habitat.
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