Tag Archives: inspection

Several inspections passed

Emerald Hill passed the wallboard screw pattern inspection. Now we can start taping and mudding.
Emerald Hill passed the wallboard screw pattern inspection. Now we can start taping and mudding.

Catching up on several inspections completed over the past four weeks …

Sheathing inspection ... passed.
Sheathing inspection … passed.
Air leakage at the rough-in testing of the duct work ... passed.
Air leakage at the rough-in testing of the duct work … passed.
Framing and insulation inspections ... passed.
Framing and insulation inspections … passed.
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Notes, 19 Aug. 2015

  • Ferguson reports replacement for the bath 2 shower pan will be 20 August.
  • Without the shower pan, Ron Dahlke and the City of Austin inspector opted to delay the framing inspection — because the plumbers are still punching holes in lumber.
  • Custom Plumbing began today to test drain lines — pulling a hose through the house to fill drains with water in the master, laundry/utility, bath 3, mudroom. The master shower leaked and was quickly fixed. It’s better to test now, before the insulation goes in and the drywall goes up …
  • The painters caulked the bottom plates where the lumber met the slab, sealing against air, water and insects. If you build new today, the framers unroll a thin layer of foam that adheres to the bottom of the bottom plate — the foam was not invented in 1968 when Emerald Hill was built. Silicon caulk is the alternate to ripping down the house and starting over with new lumber and foam.
  • The painters caulked today because Ranserve will spray borate on the exposed framing of the first floor. Termites don’t like borate. Steven and Jacquela and Ron don’t like termites. We’ve seen the damage termites do. The framers were forced to replace a lot of lumber that the bugs chewed through. The borate is a line of defense — and it is also required by the Austin Energy Green Build program.
  • Ron now plans to re-attempt the framing inspection for Friday this week, or early next.
  • Ron put the insulation team on alert to start next week as soon as Emerald Hill passes the framing inspection — with drywall anticipated for the first week of September.
  • Steven received and is reviewing updated quotes for door handles and hardware, and for tile — and the potential third garage bay.
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Electrical inspection — passed!

From the City of Austin permit records ...
From the City of Austin permit records …

City of Austin Inspector Daniel Barrera walked Emerald Hill today with Ron. The house passed the electrical rough-in inspection.

Now we can turn the corner on building the house forward.

Thank you to Steve Gephart and the entire team from Capstone Electric.

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Plumbing inspection 1

Emerald Hill passed its first plumbing inspection — rough-inĀ at the first floor slab — the pipes that will be encased in new concrete as the slab is patched and sealed.

Follow the white PVC pipe up the wall, across a ceiling chase, then up to the second floor for a straight run to the upper roof.
Follow the white PVC pipe up the wall, across a ceiling chase, then up to the second floor for a straight run to the upper roof.

In the kitchen, Barry, Art and crew configured this new vent stack at the kitchen sink. They tied into the existing stack, ran the PVC pipe in the gap between the back of the exterior brick and the new vertical studs, up the wall on the opposite side of the studs, into the wedge under the lower roof, through a stud bay, up to the second floor, through a second stud bay and then up to the second-floor roof. This is the art and science that ensures “air behind water” without cutting apart the structure of the house.

Why do we not cut structure?

When the house was built, the plumbers cut through two joists that hold up the second floor. All they had to do, instead, was run the pipe between the ceiling joists to get a clean exit. How this passed inspection when the house was built is a mystery.
When the house was built, the plumbers cut through two joists that hold up the second floor. All they had to do, instead, was run the pipe between the ceiling joists to get a clean exit. How this passed inspection when the house was built is a mystery.

The original plumbers cut so much structure from two parallel beams that everyone wonders how the house did not collapse. It explains why the second floor dipped. Ranserve and the framers have now “sistered” in an LVL to hold up the second floor.

 

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