Tag Archives: carpentry

Notes, 10 Nov. 2015

Above, the plumbers are back to correct the fittings behind the vanities — so that we don’t have to carve the vanities into pieces with power tools.

Shane is carpenting in the hallway to "Jadinland" -- bedrooms 1 and 2 and bath 3 -- installing door casing.
Shane is carpenting in the hallway to “Jadinland” — bedrooms 1 and 2 and bath 3 — installing door casing.
Here is Shane prepping the lumber that will become the vertical casing inside bedroom 2.
Here is Shane prepping the lumber that will become the vertical casing inside bedroom 2.
Peering down the upstairs hall, Shane and Peter have stacked lumber in place to build the door casings for the hallway closet, bedroom 4, on the left, and bath 3 and the utility room on the right.
Peering down the upstairs hall, Shane and Peter have stacked lumber in place to build the door casings for the hallway closet, bedroom 4, on the left, and bath 3 and the utility room on the right.
Peter nails trim into place near the front door, wrapping intricate cut around cut at the windows and stairs.
Peter nails trim into place near the still-temporary front door, wrapping intricate cut around cut at the windows and stairs.
Chris from the cabinet shop was just leaving as Steven arrived. He's been busy, installing the upper shelves and base cabinets in the pantry hallway ...
Chris from the cabinet shop was just leaving as Steven arrived. He’s been busy, installing the upper shelves and base cabinets in the pantry hallway …
The drawers into the cabinet where we will store cutlery and plates and glasses ...
The drawers into the cabinet where we will store cutlery and plates and glasses …
... and assembling the bank of utility cabinets to the right of where the refrigerator will slide against the wall.
… and assembling the bank of utility cabinets to the right of where the refrigerator will slide against the wall.
The construction team that will pour the garage foundation today trucked out a pile of dirt and rubble at what was the kitchen deck.
The construction team that will pour the garage foundation today trucked out a pile of dirt and rubble at what was the kitchen deck.
And they began trenching for the garage-slab footings.
And they began trenching for the garage-slab footings.
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Week ending 6 Nov. 2015

Above — delivered earlier this week, the base cabinets have been moved into the pantry hallway for installation.

Patrick installs the skirt board along the stairs.
Peter installs the skirt board along the stairs.

Ron Dahlke files this week’s summary:

This week:

  • Installed interior doors
  • Started trim
  • Continued on cabinet install
  • Finished template of countertops
  • Started removal of patio
  • Started excavation of soil for new garage
  • Site visit by Harway appliance installer

Next week:

Kathleen Baker reports “the light order has already been placed [with Lights Fantastic]. Tracy just forgot to send us the confirmation. Most everything is in, they are waiting on the fans. I expect to get the confirmation email on Monday.”

Saturday update: Tracy reports the fans will arrive 10 or 11 November and "everything else is here and ready to go."

Steven met with Kathleen this morning to begin work on the forms that must be submitted to qualify for the Austin Energy Green Building Program. This will require extensive documentation. Stay tuned.

Steven also met at Emerald Hill with Jonathan Hiebert from Push Pull Open Close to finalize selections for the front door handles and the pocket-door hardware. Jonathan promises to finalize the quote and message that to Kathleen for formal submital to and approval by Steven and Jacquela.

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Meanwhile, in the woodshop

Shane and Peter continue to carpenter through Emerald Hill — pulling lumber from the rack in the family room, cutting it to length and dimension, nailing it into place, trailing blue pneumatic hoses across the floors.

Above, Shane steps away from the chopsaw and lumber rack in the family room after cutting a board to length.

The carpentry leaves behind piles of sawdust and remnants of shims.
The carpentry leaves behind piles of sawdust and remnants of shims.
All the cutoffs and detritus wind up in this one trash bucket next to the chop saw.
All the cutoffs and detritus wind up in this one trash bucket next to the chop saw. Every day, Shane and Peter sweep and shovel up the cuttings and sawdust, bringing the trash can closer to full., cleaning up as they work.
At the side window in the office, Shane shows Steven the window trim -- the stool and skirt, cut straight at the turn in the drywall, with no "ears" to wrap around the drywall. Simpler, easier, faster -- and more modern that something that requires at least three cuts and scribing. The key in all this is to ensure that the handle to crank open the window is not obstructed and that the lumber doesn't crack a knuckle as your hand turns the crank. This approach succeeds -- almost like we planned it.
At the side window in the office, Shane shows Steven the window trim — the stool and skirt, cut straight at the turn in the drywall, with no “ears” to wrap around the drywall. Simpler, easier, faster — and more modern that something that requires at least three cuts and scribing. The key in all this is to ensure that the handle to crank open the window is not obstructed and that the lumber doesn’t crack a knuckle as your hand turns the crank. This approach succeeds — almost like we planned it.
Upstairs in the utility room, Shane and Peter have installed the attic ladder -- and trimmed it around with the same lumber that will be used for casing around the doors. Their attention to detail ensures a consistent look and feel throughout the house. The pole in Shane's right hand will be used to pull down the ladder if the pull cord frays apart -- belts and suspenders.
Upstairs in the utility room, Shane and Peter have installed the attic ladder — and trimmed it around with the same lumber that will be used for casing around the doors. Their attention to detail ensures a consistent look and feel throughout the house. The pole in Shane’s right hand will be used to pull down the ladder if the pull cord in Shane’s left hand frays apart — belts and suspenders.
Shane shows the attic stair open and extended. Steven took his first climb. The aluminum is lighter and easier to work with than a heavy wooden attic stair. The unit is also lightly insulated, to help seal off the attic when the ladder is closed against the ceiling.
Shane shows the attic stair open and extended. Steven took his first climb. The aluminum is lighter and easier to work with than a heavy wooden attic stair. The unit is also lightly insulated, to help seal off the attic when the ladder is closed against the ceiling.
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More doors

There are more than 30 doors inside Emerald Hill, not counting the four doors that open to the outside of the house.

Shane and Peter are quickly mounting all the interior doors into place, shimming them plumb and level.

Above, Shane and Peter have turned the family room into a workshop — stacked with lumber, tools, sawhorses, glue, packages of shims, boxes of nails. And, on the floor at center front of photo, they have unboxed the attic ladder.

Patrick tests the door to Steven's office for plumb -- and the reveal between the door and the doorjamb.
Peter tests the door to Steven’s office for plumb — and the reveal between the door and the doorjamb.
Here's the attic ladder, carried upstairs to the utility room, prepped to install into the ceiling hatch.
Here’s the attic ladder, carried upstairs to the utility room, prepped to install into the ceiling hatch.
Patrick checks a closet door in Jadin's bedroom after tacking the frame into place. Using the level he checks for plumb. Several times, he knocks the wood of the doorjamb with his knuckles to tap the wood a fraction of an inch.
Peter checks a closet door in Jadin’s bedroom after tacking the frame into place. Using the level he checks for plumb. Several times, he knocks the wood of the doorjamb with his knuckles to tap the wood a fraction of an inch.
After nailing into position the door to the master bath, Patrick is the first person to swing the door open and step through. To get to this point, he has shimmed the door on both sides. It took stacks of shims, because the doorway was framed with extra space. As a result, there are large gaps on each side of the door between the jamb and the wall framing -- almost 3/4 of an inch. Patrick explains he will have to toenail the casing into place to cover the gap, carefully, to create the proper reveal.
After nailing into position the door to the master bath, Peter is the first person to swing the door open and step through. To get to this point, he has shimmed the door on both sides. It took stacks of shims, because the doorway was framed with extra space. As a result, there are large gaps on each side of the door between the jamb and the wall framing — almost 3/4 of an inch. Peter explains he will have to toenail the casing into place to cover the gap, carefully, to create the proper reveal.
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What’s behind door #1, Shane?

Big day. Shane and his dad Peter have set up horses and a chop saw in the family room, next to the lumber rack. Batteries are charging. At least 10 packages of wood shims are lined up. There’s a box filled with cans of wood putty on the floor.

It’s time to begin hanging doors.

Above, Shane shows off the first door to be installed — the closet door in bedroom 4.

Patrick's got the nail gun ready as Shane hoists into place the closet door in what will be the train room.
Peter’s got the nail gun ready as Shane hoists into place the closet door in what will be the train room.
At the back, Patrick tips up and Shane pivots to vertical the door to bedroom 4 from the upstairs hallway.
At the back, Peter tips up and Shane pivots to vertical the door to bedroom 4 from the upstairs hallway.
Patrick guides the door into position as Shane tips it into place.
Peter guides the door into position as Shane tips it into place.
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Meet the carpenters

No. Not the first album from Karen and Richard Carpenter. Gag me.

It’s a dual-milestone day at Emerald Hill. The first is … Ron and Steven are turning over the house to, drum roll, please, the carpenters — Peter and Shane Morris, father and son, originally from north of London, fresh off finishing a 13,000 sq. ft. house somewhere else in Austin.

This is going to be fun.

Above, Shane, left, Peter, middle, and Ron Dahlke from Ranserve talk through each step of the casing, trim and other details they plan to start cutting and nailing tomorrow.

Today was planning day — walk the house with Steven, ask questions about how many shelves in this closet and how many rods, square edge on the window stool or “ear” that wraps around a drywall corner, baseboard options at the master shower, where to work around electrical panels, and more.

Communicate first. Plan second. Measure twice. Cut once.

It’s time to “dress the house.”

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