Taking possession

It’s finally time to re-key all five exterior locks, switching out from the construction keys. Walter from Cothron Safe & Lock set to it.

Walter removed and disassembled the locksets from each door.
Walter removed and disassembled the locksets from each door.
This tray holds pins to go into the cylinder. Each color designates a different width or length for locks made by different manufacturers.
This tray holds pins to go into the cylinder. Each color designates a different width or length for locks made by different manufacturers.
Four of the cylinders that Walter has to open and match to the fifth cylinder we are using as the "master."
Four of the cylinders that Walter has to open and match to the fifth cylinder we are using as the “master.”
Walter uses a special wrench to unlock the retainer on the cylinder.
Walter uses a special wrench to unlock the retainer on the cylinder.
After removing the retainer, Walter uses a shim and a blank key to twist the plug free of the cylinder without losing the springs mounted inside the tower.
After removing the retainer, Walter uses a shim and a blank key to twist the plug free of the cylinder without losing the springs mounted inside the tower.
There are five pins in the plug. Each color indicates a different size pin. Walter has to match all five pins in all five locksets. When this is done, one key will unlock any of the five exterior doors.
There are five pins in the plug. Each color indicates a different size pin. Walter has to match all five pins in all five locksets. When this is done, one key will unlock any of the five exterior doors.
When the pins are all correctly assembled, Walter puts each lock assembly back together in reverse order of disassembly. Here, he reinstall the lock mechanism to the front door. As Walter finished with each door, Steven tested one key in each of the five locks, to ensure that all five operated with that one keyset.
When the pins are all correctly assembled, Walter puts each lock assembly back together in reverse order of disassembly. Here, he reinstall the lock mechanism to the front door. As Walter finished with each door, Steven tested one key in each of the five locks, to ensure that all five operated with that one keyset.
Walter stamps a numeric code onto the "master" key that operates all five doors, that serves as the model for duplicate keys. This code matches the size pin that must be inserted into the cylinder, if we ever have to repair and rekey the locks again.
Walter stamps a numeric code onto the “master” key that operates all five doors, that serves as the model for duplicate keys. This code matches the size pin that must be inserted into the cylinder, if we ever have to repair and rekey the locks again.
As the penultimate step, Walter cuts duplicate keys. Steven tested all the duplicate keys in all exterior doors, to ensure they all work. When done, Walter wrote up the bill and sent it via cellphone to the office. Done.
As the penultimate step, Walter cuts duplicate keys. Steven tested all the duplicate keys in all exterior doors, to ensure they all work. When done, Walter wrote up the bill and sent it via cellphone to the office. Done.
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28 miles

Saturday morning. Steven is back from the IFA 2016 GPC in Hong Kong and Shenzhen, China. He needs bike, air, sun, sweat to flush away the 30 hour ride back in three aluminum tubes branded by United Airlines. Jadin has a horseback riding lesson near Pflugerville, north of Austin, where the land rolls flat. There’s less traffic. Jacquela, Jadin, riding boots, bike, helmet, water — loaded into car.

2.5 hours later, Steven sets new records for time on the bike and distance — 28 miles.

And a butterfly rode for about 1 minute on Steven’s left knee.

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747 upper deck — once in a lifetime

UA¬†862 Hong Kong to San Francisco, a double-decker 747, soon to be retired by United Airlines. Steven has flown something more than 1 million miles lifetime since his first flight as a teen. But this is a first — riding upstairs to the US from Asia.

No one opened a window shade to watch the world spin past. 14 hours locked away in a closet. Shame.

Looking forward to the flight deck at the end of the upper cabin.
Looking forward to the flight deck at the end of the upper cabin.
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IFA 2016 GPC, day 2

The IFA GPC shifted to Shenzhen, China, leaving Hong Kong.

Here’s the photo essay:

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IFA 2016 GPC, day 1

Steven traveled to Hong Kong and Shenzhen for the IFA 2016 Global Press Conference.

Here’s a photo essay.

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3 old dudes diverted by Hong Kong fog

Above, Steve, left, Tim Bajarin, middle, and Larry Magid, right, traveled up the tram to the Peak overlook of Hong Kong, hoping to see what the city and harbor look like. But … it’s foggy. And it’s cloudy. Tim and Larry joked that we got lost in the Internet cloud.

A photo essay.

Panoramic shot of the Hong Kong channel.
Panoramic shot of the Hong Kong channel.
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First contact, Hong Kong

Steven is in Hong Kong for the IFA Global Press Conference. His first trip to Hong Kong. There are 12 hours before the first US journalists arrive. He opted to ride the subway, walk the streets, ride the Shelley Street escalator to the MidLevels.

Above, this is apparently one of the longest outdoor, covered escalators in the world. It runs up during the day, but down in the morning when everyone rides down from homes on the MidLevels. If you ride up, you have to walk down a couple of thousand rain-slick steps.

This tree is rooted in a concrete retainer wall. On the way up the escalator.
This tree is rooted in a concrete retainer wall. On the way up the escalator.
There's a street market on the walk down.
There’s a street market on the walk down.
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From a balcony overlooking the Central Station subway passageways. Busy.

Jetlag caught up with Steven. He crashed back at the hotel.

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