Notes, 15 Jan. 2015

Chris from Central Texas Custom Cabinets continues to finish out the kitchen and pantry cabinets.

Steven walked the house today with Elizabeth, who measured for blinds — a candidate supplier; it will all come down to budget.

Ron opened up the drywall behind the mudroom shower -- where the tankless water unit will soon be installed -- to add blocking behind the shower panels. This will enable the plumbers to properly screw the shower head fixture tight to the plastic panels.
Ron opened up the drywall behind the mudroom shower — where the tankless water unit will soon be installed — to add blocking behind the shower panels. This will enable the plumbers to properly screw the shower head fixture tight to the plastic panels.

Ron needs an escutcheon at the pot filler on the backsplash wall. Ron also needs a push-in-pop-out drain for the vanity sink in the mudroom — because there is no room behind the faucet for the pull that would normally open and close the drain in the sink. Ferguson does not carry an escutcheon for the pot filler. Steven went to Lowe’s with a shopping list. He found two candidates for the escutcheon. The drain was out of stock. On a field trip to a second Lowe’s after dinner with Jacquela, he found the only two candidate devices. Ron and the plumbers will now decide which one to install. The loser will go back to Lowe’s.

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The owl sure looks like Freddy

Zoom lens to get a better shot of the owl sleeping in the exhaust duct on the exterior wall of the house above the master bath and kitchen.

We’re happy to see the return of the owl that Jadin dubbed “Freddy.” But … we don’t want it living in the duct.

Ron Dahlke is checking with animal control experts to determine how to evict the owl without harming it.

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Fixing cracks in drywall ceilings

Chris and the team from Celis Drywall walked Emerald Hill yesterday, inspecting the drywall for cracks where hot/cold weather cycles propel expansion and contraction.

Today they chipped out drywall along seams in the ceiling of nearly every room. Then Chris added a ton of drywall screws to each sheet of drywall, tightening the panels to the ceiling lumber. Next he applied yellow fiberglass tape to the joint. This tape is more flexible than paper tape. Then came drywall mud to cover the tape.

Above, Chris working on stilts in the kitchen ceiling. This is the location where a water leak damaged the joint between two sheets of drywall; the plumbers were installing fixtures in the master bath above the kitchen — and a fitting leaked. 

All the other cracks are caused by expansion and contraction issue. Chris says this is normal, expected — and Celis Drywall plans to inspect each job.

The long horizontal ceiling cracks in the train room, and a vertical crack at the back wall above the window.
The long horizontal ceiling cracks in the train room, and a vertical crack at the back wall above the window.
Cracks in the ceiling of the upstairs loft.
Cracks in the ceiling of the upstairs loft.
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Glass doors, step 2

Billy and Charlie late yesterday continued to install glass doors to showers.

The glass door to the mudroom shower. Ron Dahlke stuck blue painter's tape on the glass as a visual clue to help prevent people from walking into the glass; it's been so long that we've become accustomed to assuming that the glass is not there to avoid; this will help prevent walking into the glass.
The glass door to the mudroom shower. Ron Dahlke stuck blue painter’s tape on the glass as a visual clue to help prevent people from walking into the glass; it’s been so long that we’ve become accustomed to assuming that the glass is not there to avoid; a simple precaution.
Ron used blue tape to also better identify the glass door and wall panel to the water closet in bath 2 -- Jadin's bath.
Ron used blue tape to also better identify the glass door and wall panel to the water closet in bath 2 — Jadin’s bath.
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