Templating, part 2

With the kitchen island cabinets now in place, “Dimensional R” from Austin Stone Works — he asks to not be named, and to not have his face photographed — is back to build the template for the kitchen island.

Today, R uses thin strips of wood instead of the white plastic. He has to span the storage cabinets at the right side of photo, above, across the open seating area where we plan to put four stools, to the shelf cabinet at the far left end of the island. The plastic will sag; the wood strips hold their dimensions.

Everything must be clearly marked for the fabricators -- which template abuts the next -- in order for the quartz to be cut correctly.
Everything must be clearly marked for the fabricators — which template abuts the next — in order for the quartz to be cut correctly.
R opened a package of the cabinet pulls, using one as a reference to determine how far past the pull the countertop should extend -- 3/4 of an inch.
R opened a package of the cabinet pulls, using one as a reference to determine how far past the pull the countertop should extend — 3/4 of an inch out from the front of the cabinet box, where the tape measure starts, to just past the front of the pull.
Now that he knows the pull dimensions and clearance, R builds an entirely new template for the counter that runs from the dishwasher past the sink and cooktop to the dog station at the end closest to the camera.
Now that he knows the pull dimensions and clearance, R builds an entirely new template for the counter that runs from the dishwasher past the sink and cooktop to the dog station at the end closest to the camera.
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“They’re in the trees”

Steven tried to use Google to identify the source of that headline quote. No joy.

One of the first steps in this remodeling adventure took place in May 2015, when Davey Trees trimmed back several large oak limbs that obstructed access to the house for dumpsters and construction supplies.

Today, Davey Trees is back to execute phase 2 of the tree projects at Emerald Hill.

We bought this house in part for the trees. They are mature, amazing. Today is the day to “cut away the curtains” and better frame the exterior of the house with light and air.

Here’s a photo essay.

In the back yard, Chris cuts low-hanging limbs off the oak tree at the rear corner of the existing garage -- while Barry bends to pick up cuttings. We need to raise the canopy of this oak and cut it back from where the new third bay of the garage will soon be built.
In the back yard, Chris cuts low-hanging limbs off the oak tree at the rear corner of the existing garage — while Barry bends to pick up cuttings. We need to raise the canopy of this oak and cut it back from where the new third bay of the garage will soon be built.
Atop the existing garage, Chris cuts back branches that touch the roof, passing them down to Bernard, who is also protecting the white cabinets just delivered by Central Texas Custom Cabinets.
Atop the existing garage, Chris cuts back branches that touch the roof, passing them down to Bernard, who is also protecting the white cabinets just delivered by Central Texas Custom Cabinets.
Chris begins cutting away the long limb that projects across the side of the second storey above the kitchen roof and adjacent to the master suite.
Chris begins cutting away the long limb that projects across the side of the second storey above the kitchen roof and adjacent to the master suite.
A chunk of oak limb falls to the ground. Barry later explains that one foot of oak limb that size weighs 50 pounds. It hits the stone of the kitchen deck with a thunk that is solid, substantial, concussing the rock deck.
Chris cuts. Bernard observes for safety. A chunk of oak limb falls to the ground. Barry later explains that one foot of oak limb that size weighs 50 pounds. It hits the stone of the kitchen deck with a thunk that is solid, substantial, concussing the rock deck.
Chris cuts away a second, larger section of oak limb.
Chris cuts away a second, larger section of oak limb.
Bernard, left, and Barry load everything into the chipper -- which is loud and ravenous.
Bernard, left, and Barry load everything into the chipper — which is loud and ravenous.
The chipper produces a pile of mulch that will be used to help landscape around the house.
The chipper produces a pile of mulch that will be used to help landscape around the house.
Each of the large cuts to the oaks leaves a wound that must be sealed. Barry shows off the spray can fitted into a sleeve on a long pole, with pull cord -- an assembly used to reach high into the trees to the wounds.
Each of the large cuts to the oaks leaves a wound that must be sealed. Barry shows off the spray can of sealer fitted into a sleeve on a long pole, with pull cord — an assembly used to reach high into the trees to the wounds.
From the ground, Bernard reaches up with the spray can on a pole to seal a wound on an oak that Chris just cut.
From the ground, Bernard reaches up with the spray can on a pole to seal a wound on an oak that Chris just cut.
At the front of the house, Chris trims suckers off a large oak limb.
At the front of the house, Chris trims suckers off a large oak limb.
Barry, at right, takes a quick break to admire the view and his work from atop the roof.
Barry, at right, takes a quick break to admire the view and his work from atop the roof. Chris, at left, is moving power tools into position for more cuts. Together, they have already cut away several small branches and dead wood that brushed against the roof in strong winds. This reduces the risk of potential damage to the house.
Break time's over.
Break time’s over. Back to trimming away branches and throwing the cuttings off the roof, to the ground.
Shooting from inside the upstairs loft, Steven photographs Chris making some of the last cuts of the day to a long limb that reaches across the front of the house and into the yard next door -- a limb that is too close for comfort to the exterior of Emerald Hill.
Shooting from inside the upstairs loft, Steven photographs Chris making some of the last cuts of the day to a long limb that reaches across the front of the house and into the yard next door — a limb that is too close for comfort to the exterior of Emerald Hill. Bernard works the belaying rope from below to ensure that the limb swings away from the house as it is cut, to do no damage.
At the end of the day, almost all the low-hanging limbs and branches that reached to within mere feet of the house have been cut away, creating clearance between the trees and the house.
At the end of the day, almost all the low-hanging limbs and branches that reached to within mere feet of the house have been cut away, creating clearance between the trees and the house.
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More doors

There are more than 30 doors inside Emerald Hill, not counting the four doors that open to the outside of the house.

Shane and Peter are quickly mounting all the interior doors into place, shimming them plumb and level.

Above, Shane and Peter have turned the family room into a workshop — stacked with lumber, tools, sawhorses, glue, packages of shims, boxes of nails. And, on the floor at center front of photo, they have unboxed the attic ladder.

Patrick tests the door to Steven's office for plumb -- and the reveal between the door and the doorjamb.
Peter tests the door to Steven’s office for plumb — and the reveal between the door and the doorjamb.
Here's the attic ladder, carried upstairs to the utility room, prepped to install into the ceiling hatch.
Here’s the attic ladder, carried upstairs to the utility room, prepped to install into the ceiling hatch.
Patrick checks a closet door in Jadin's bedroom after tacking the frame into place. Using the level he checks for plumb. Several times, he knocks the wood of the doorjamb with his knuckles to tap the wood a fraction of an inch.
Peter checks a closet door in Jadin’s bedroom after tacking the frame into place. Using the level he checks for plumb. Several times, he knocks the wood of the doorjamb with his knuckles to tap the wood a fraction of an inch.
After nailing into position the door to the master bath, Patrick is the first person to swing the door open and step through. To get to this point, he has shimmed the door on both sides. It took stacks of shims, because the doorway was framed with extra space. As a result, there are large gaps on each side of the door between the jamb and the wall framing -- almost 3/4 of an inch. Patrick explains he will have to toenail the casing into place to cover the gap, carefully, to create the proper reveal.
After nailing into position the door to the master bath, Peter is the first person to swing the door open and step through. To get to this point, he has shimmed the door on both sides. It took stacks of shims, because the doorway was framed with extra space. As a result, there are large gaps on each side of the door between the jamb and the wall framing — almost 3/4 of an inch. Peter explains he will have to toenail the casing into place to cover the gap, carefully, to create the proper reveal.
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Kitchen cabinet install, 3 Nov. 2015

The day began with Randy and Chris delivering more cabinet boxes to install.

The base cabinets for the pantry hallway, left, and the upper shelf cabinets, stacked outside on the stone deck next to the kitchen.
The base cabinets for the pantry hallway, left, and the upper shelf cabinets, stacked outside on the stone deck next to the kitchen.
Chris uses his head to help hold the cabinet in place as Randy, right, guides the box into position atop a temporary plywood ledger. This is the big and deep storage cabinet located above the refrigerator.
Chris uses his head to help hold the cabinet in place as Randy, right, guides the box into position atop a temporary plywood ledger. This is the big and deep storage cabinet located above the refrigerator.
After hanging the large and deep above-refrigerator cabinet, Randy, left, and Chris, tip the adjacent tower into position. This tower features a "chest" with drawers for forks, knives, spoons, plates and bowls, and an upper box for glassware. The back of this tall unit also serves as the support for the left side of the above-refrigerator cabinet.
After hanging the large and deep above-refrigerator cabinet, Randy, left, and Chris, tip the adjacent tower into position. This tower features a “chest” with drawers for forks, knives, spoons, plates and bowls, and an upper box for glassware. The back of this tall unit also serves as the support for the left side of the above-refrigerator cabinet.
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What to do about the tile in the master shower?

Jacquela and Steven walked Emerald Hill over the weekend. Jacquela got to the master shower and said “the grout lines do not line up. That’s wrong.”

She sent a note to Ron and Mark at Ranserve to ask whether this is possible to correct?

This, for the record, is the first time Jacquela has objected to anything in this project.

Above, here’s how the grout lines and tile do not align properly at one wall of the master shower.

Here's the opposite wall where it meets the floor, near the linear drain, with the grout lines offset from each other.
Here’s the opposite wall where it meets the floor, near the linear drain, with the grout lines offset from each other.

This morning, Ron and Steve stood in the shower to discuss options. Then we checked the supply of floor and wall tile left over in the garage. There’s enough black floor tile to re-do the floor, if that is what we opt to do.

Ron plans to discuss options with Julian, the tile setter.

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What’s behind door #1, Shane?

Big day. Shane and his dad Peter have set up horses and a chop saw in the family room, next to the lumber rack. Batteries are charging. At least 10 packages of wood shims are lined up. There’s a box filled with cans of wood putty on the floor.

It’s time to begin hanging doors.

Above, Shane shows off the first door to be installed — the closet door in bedroom 4.

Patrick's got the nail gun ready as Shane hoists into place the closet door in what will be the train room.
Peter’s got the nail gun ready as Shane hoists into place the closet door in what will be the train room.
At the back, Patrick tips up and Shane pivots to vertical the door to bedroom 4 from the upstairs hallway.
At the back, Peter tips up and Shane pivots to vertical the door to bedroom 4 from the upstairs hallway.
Patrick guides the door into position as Shane tips it into place.
Peter guides the door into position as Shane tips it into place.
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Kitchen cabinet install, continuing

Above, Randy from Central Texas Custom Cabinets is back again to continue installing kitchen cabinets. After slicing open the drywall behind the kitchen side door, he pulls off the lower panel to begin creating the pocket into which one of the cabinets will be fitted. This was Aaron’s idea — to make the tall pantry cabinet deeper, creating more storage. 

Randy removes the upper panel of drywall after slicing it carefully with a sharp utility knife and a level as a straightedge to guide the knife.
Randy removes the upper panel of drywall after slicing it carefully with a sharp utility knife and a level as a straightedge to guide the knife.
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Fence posting

DSC_5330Jared Hohensee purchased the house next door to remodel and flip it. He proposed a three-neighbor project to replace the fence across the sides and back of that lot, asking Steven and Jacquela to share the cost of the shared side fence. Steven said yes.

Today, the crew ripped out the old rotted cedar slats and posts, and began planting new steel posts into cement.

Good fence projects make good neighbors.

DSC_5396

 

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