Remodeling discovery

During demo, Ranserve opened up the wall at the back of the front entry — and we discovered it was originally open when the house was built, but closed off during an earlier remodel.

That was one discovery.

Today, Steven made another. After walking past the lumber framing for weeks, he looked up … and … on the 2×4 used to close off the passage, the remodelers signed their work.

Share. Link. Like.

Goodbye skylight

A prior remodel installed a skylight into the roof over what was the master bathroom, which was also remodeled at the same time. We guess.

A skylight over what will be the laundry and utility room makes no sense to the Leons — especially when it intrudes into the ideal location for the attic ladder.

So out it comes, for donation to Habitat.

Above, the skylight, removed, ready to go to Habitat.

Roberto on the roof and Jonathan below lever new roof rafters into position to replace structure cut when the skylight was first remodeled into place.
Roberto on the roof and Jonathan below lever new roof rafters into position to replace structure cut when the skylight was first remodeled into place.
Plywood in the roof closes off the location of the former skylight. The lumber box in the ceiling frame is where the attic ladder will be installed.
Plywood in the roof closes off the location of the former skylight. The lumber box in the ceiling frame is where the attic ladder will be installed.

The roof is now closed up with plywood and lumber. And the framing is in place for the new attic ladder.

Share. Link. Like.

Flashing the roof

Flashing helps direct the flow of water around openings. Since water can seep into your home’s walls, deteriorating building materials, causing structural damage, and creating moisture and mold problems, it is very important to properly install flashing when constructing a new house or altering the exterior of a house. Flashing is used beneath the first course above ground level in a masonry building, above all wood trim on shelves, doors, and windows, where exterior stairs and decks attach to the house, and around any features in the roof structure. Below are some of the common flashing details on residential roofs. DIY Network.

The Tyvek is up. Don and his crew from Potter’s Roofing nail the roof flashing into place, tucking it under the Tyvek.

Out on the roof at the back corner of bedroom 3.
Out on the roof at the back corner of bedroom 3.

When Ranserve took out the interior drywall, Steven stood upstairs, in the center of the house, turning 360 degrees — and daylight intruded into the house through gaps between the original cedar siding and the top of the lower roof. The flashing and Tyvek begin to seal those gaps. The house won’t be airtight when Ranserve is done, but a lot less heating and air conditioning will escape, helping the house qualify for the Austin Energy Green Building program.

Share. Link. Like.

Open / close

Above, Cris from Ranserve bores the hole for the door bolt while relocating the original door 90 degrees, to be used now as a construction entry.

Awnings below, fixed glass above.
Awnings below, fixed glass above.

The new windows at the front of the library are open, operable.

The new windows at the back of the family room.
The new windows at the back of the family room.

The new windows at the back of the family room are installed. Here’s the view from inside.

The new family room windows, flashed against water.
The new family room windows, flashed against water.

And from outside.

The new window at the front of bedroom 1.
The new window at the front of bedroom 1.

Marco and Jonathan check level and plumb for the new window at the front of bedroom 1.

Share. Link. Like.

Befores / Afters

The exterior of the kitchen wall as of 22 July 2015.
The exterior of the kitchen wall as of 22 July 2015.

Yesterday, the brick exterior wall at the back of the kitchen was cut open for the new, larger window over the kitchen sink — and the original sliding glass door was still in place.

Same wall, 24 hours later. The new office window to the left, the new kitchen window to the right.
Same wall, 24 hours later. The new office window to the left, the new kitchen window to the right.

Today, the framing crew cut open the wall to add the new window to Steven’s office, and then mounted the new office and kitchen windows into place.

New window on the left was a brick wall yesterday.
New window on the left was a brick wall yesterday.

Here’s the new window in the office, from inside the office. More light!

The sliding glass door is removed from the back wall of the kitchen, and concrete mixed to create a new footing.
The sliding glass door is removed from the back wall of the kitchen, and concrete mixed to create a new footing.

And the sliding glass door has been removed. The brick wall here will be extended to the right, toward the garage. A new 36-inch wide exterior door will slot into the corner with the garage.

The original sliding glass door from the kitchen.
The original sliding glass door from the kitchen. With Steven’s backpack sitting guard.

Here is the sliding glass door, removed, ready for donation to Habitat.

 

 

Share. Link. Like.