Learning to speak window

From Wikipedia … The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is a United States 501(c)3 non-profit organization which sponsors an energy efficiency certification and labeling program for windows, doors, and skylights.[1]

NFRC labels provide performance ratings for such products in five categories: U-Factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient, Visible Transmittance, Air Leakage, and Condensation Resistance.[1] This allows architects, builders, code officials, contractors, home owners, and specifiers to compare the energy efficiency among products, and determine whether a product meets code.

Here’s the video that NFRC uses to explain the window label.

From the Home Building / Remodeling web site:

On window labels, there are 5 basic pieces of information that are very important:

  1. U-factor measures how well a window prevents heat transfer. The lower the U-factor, the better a window’s resistance to heat flow. It also means it has a better insulating value. A window with a U-factor of 0.25 has an R-value of 4 (1/.25=4).
  2. Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) determines how well a window blocks heat from sunlight.  SHGC is measured from 0 to 1 and it’s the fraction of incident solar radiation through a window. The lower the number, the less solar heat transmits into the home.
  3. Visible Transmittance (VT) is how much light comes through a window or skylight. It’s also measured between 0 and 1. The lower the number means the lesser amount of visible light shines through. If a window has a VT of 0.85, that means that 85% of the light will transmit through the window.
  4. Air Leakage (AL) measures air infiltration through cracks in the frame, sash, and the window as a whole. The rating is shown as equivalent cubic feet of air that passes through a square foot of window. The lower the number, the lower amount of air that passes through.
  5. Condensation Resistance (CR) is the ability of the window to resist the formation of condensation on the inside of the window during colder weather. CR is measured between 0 and 100 with the higher rating indicating that it’s better at resisting condensation forming on the interior of the window.
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The first windows go in

Delivered today. Installed today. Ron Dahlke is NOT wasting time.

From left … casements at the loft, fixed window over the stairwell, awning at the laundry room.

Photo shot by Jacquela using her Galaxy 5.

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Out, out damn spot

It’s time to get rid of the oversized brick hearth. Finally.

It intrudes into the family room at shin height, sharp, oversized, imposing, sucking up room.

Kevin, son of Mark Rehberg, president of Ranserve, the builder, jackhammered it out.

He saved the good brick for re-use at the new front entry.

DSC_2041

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Mixing water and electricity

Surprise. Ron has the plumber and the electrician in the house at the same time.

Art and the team from Custom Pluming continue to jackhammer away at the foundation and install PVC pipes. That’s Art in the photo above, leveling the PVC pipe for the drains in the mudroom

While the plumbers are deep in the trenches cut by jackhammers … Sean and his team of electricians are on site, two days early, installing ceiling cans, nailing up blue electrical outlet boxes at proposed locations.

Ron pulled Steve into the kitchen to talk about the ceiling cans over the aisles. There’s a triple-beam almost precisely where the plans call to install three 6-inch LEDs. With help from Sean, we measured it out with two tape measures — the cabinets extend 24 inches from the wall, the aisle runs next to the cabinets, the center of the aisle is just about directly under one of the three beams in the triple beam … but if we turn the cans 90 degrees and slide them all the way over, Sean is able to install the cans over the aisle, one inch closer to the cabinets, putting the light beams from the can overhead and closer to the cooktop and sink, providing more light. And all this aligns with the ceiling cans that will be installed in the adjoining pantry and mudroom, establishing a straight line of overhead lights.

And then we turned 90 degrees to compute the center of the cooktop, extending that line into the center of the island.

Sean, at rear, and Ron, in front, measure out the center line of the cooktop, which determines the alignment of the kitchen island, which in turn determines the alignment of all the ceiling cans above the island and aisles on each side of the island.
Sean, at rear, and Ron, in front, measure out the center line of the cooktop, which determines the alignment of the kitchen island, which in turn determines the alignment of all the ceiling cans above the island and aisles on each side of the island.
Sean, left, and Ron, at back, debate where to put the ceiling cans if the kitchen has 10 extra inches now that the framing is up -- the room is 10 inches wider than calculated in the plans. Jacquela will enjoy the extra space in the kitchen.
Sean, left, and Ron, at back, debate where to put the ceiling cans if the kitchen has 10 extra inches now that the framing is up — the room is 10 inches wider than calculated in the plans. Jacquela will enjoy the extra space in the kitchen.
The plumbers jackhammered the slab in bath 2 to run drain and water supply lines.
The plumbers jackhammered the slab in bath 2 to run drain and water supply lines.

 

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35 sq. ft.

The only addition to the house takes place at the front entry, dictated by the need to rebuild the stairs to code. See Stairs, cascading.

Here are the new exterior walls, erected by the framers, yesterday and today. The front door is turned 90 degrees, away from the street. There will be more windows cut into the OSB sheathing, to spill more light into what was a dark hallway.

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Turtle in driveway

This not-so-little critter zoomed across the driveway and ducked into its shell when we approached.

About one foot long, head to tail; about 10 inches wide.

We put out lettuce, a tomato and water. Turtle drank, dragged the lettuce off into the bushes, left the tomato behind — just like Steven, who does not like tomatoes <g>.

 

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Delivery day — windows, Tyvek, Hardie

Ron Dahlke is cranking at Emerald Hill. Martel Windows & Doors delivered the Milgard windows. Tyvek housewrap and Hardie board arrived.

The Milgard windows stacked in what will be the library/dining room.
The Milgard windows stacked in what will be the library/dining room.
The last three Milgard windows arrive.
The last three Milgard windows arrive.
The front windows for the library/dining room.
The front windows for the library/dining room. Photo shot with Jacquela’s Galaxy 5.
Two rolls of Tyvek house wrap and trim lumber, stored on the garage floor.
Two rolls of Tyvek house wrap and trim lumber, stored on the garage floor.
A palette of Hardie board exterior siding, stacked on the driveway.
A palette of Hardie board exterior siding, stacked on the driveway.
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